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10 - 27 October 2019

Sławomir Zubrzycki

Sławomir Zubrzycki

Sławomir Zubrzycki – pianist and composer born in Cracow. In 1988 Sławomir Zubrzycki graduated from the Academy of Music in Cracow, where he studied piano in Professor Tadeusz Żmudziński?s class, and modern music in Professor Adam Kaczyński?s class. Having received a grant from The Fulbright Program, he continued to study piano at The Boston Conservatory of Music under the supervision of Janice Weber in 1990-91. The pianist also developed his artistic skills by participating in master classes taught by: Victor Merzhanov, Michael Lewin, Jerome Lowenthal, Włodzimierz Obidowicz, Johann Sonnleitner (harpsichord).

In 1987, he won a Prize at the Polish Piano Art Festival in Słupsk. Sławomir Zubrzycki has been giving concerts both as a soloist – performing with Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Cracow Philharmonic Orchestra, Capella Cracoviensis, Toruń Chamber Orchestra, Imperial College London Sinfonietta ? and as a chamber musician with Olga Szwajgier?s Quartet(being one of its members), Gwendolyn Bradley, Jadwiga Gadulanka, Andrzej Hiolski, Jeffrey Nadel, in Poland, Germany, Great Britain, Spain, Ukraine and USA. He has taken part in several festivals, including: Visiting Artist Series in Berklee College of Music, Lviv Opera Festival, Poznań Spring of Music, Festival of Cracow Composers? Music, Music in Old Cracow, Chopin Confrontations, Jewish Culture Festival in Cracow, Fest der Kontinente in Berlin, Turning Sounds in Cologne, Edinburgh Festival, and many others. He has made several recordings for Polskie Nagrania (Polish recording company), Polish Radio and Television, His repertoire includes mainly works of contemporary composers, but he also plays the clavichord (early music). He was a lecturer at Avantgarde Tirol- Academy for New Composition and Audio-Art in Austria.

In 1994 he constructed a replica of Johann Silbermann?s clavichord from 1775. In 2009 the artist started reconstructing a very rare early instrument, whose origins are traced back to Leonardo da Vinci – bowed piano, also known as Geigenwerk or Bogenklavier in German or viola organista in Italian. Being more than 500 years old, this instrument has almost been completely forgotten.